Category archives for: Canton History

True Tales from Canton’s Past: The Tragic Trio

The wreckage of the Piper Cherokee as it was found that night near the Canton/Stoughton line (Collection of the Canton Historical Society)

The weather in the Bahamas is quite beautiful this time of year, and for the members of the Skycombers Flying Club it would be a perfect way to spend a weekend away after a tough New England winter. In the early 1970s, amateur aviation had become well within the reach of many, and flying clubs […]

True Tales from Canton’s Past: Dividing Lines

We have this strange attraction to thinking that this is our land. We place fences and markers and boundaries upon our property. We feel aggrieved when a neighbor walks across our land. We feel that it is right to stop others from incursion, only after we ourselves have incurred. And through the ages there is […]

Town at a crossroads with historic ‘Little Red House’

The David Tilden House at Pequitside Farm is the subject of a major preservation project using CPA funds. (Moira Sweetland photo)

Save me! Moaned the little red house, … With eyes of wrinkled glass. Save me! Groaned the old floor boards, … Pegged in centuries past. So begins the poem “Goodbye Little Red House,” penned by Doris Peters as both a lament and a rallying cry for the historic David Tilden House after it was ordered […]

True Tales from Canton’s Past: Keep Your Powder Dry

An engraved sketch of the original powder house that was built in 1809

On Pequitside Farm there is a wonderful hidden historic site that is worthy of note. Drive past the main house and follow the road until you get to the very rear of the property. As you walk past the community gardens, take a sharp turn to the right and start walking until you reach a […]

True Tales from Canton’s Past: A Noble Example

As a boy, Armand Didot looked out of his small home in the far northern French city of Dunkirk less than 10 miles from the newly created border between Belgium. Dunkirk was part of the French Flemish north and Catholicism was the religion of the region. Didot was part of a long line of aristocratic […]

True Tales from Canton’s Past: Hospital on a Hill

The Marcus Clark House on High Street was also the Canton Hospital from 1916 to 1921. (Courtesy of the Canton Historical Society)

There is no doubt that great fanfare accompanied the crowd that showed up for the opening of the Canton Hospital on that cold day in December 1916. It was, like all things, a labor of love that took over 16 years of vision and planning to come to fruition. And there is no doubt that […]

Revere Copper Products reconnects with Canton roots

A copper roof for the historic Revere rolling mill is one of the projects recommended for funding by the CCPC. (George Comeau photo)

It once covered the original wooden dome of the Massachusetts State House and protected the hull of the nation’s most famous war ship. And now that same, good old-fashioned, American-made Revere copper could be making its way home to Canton, thanks to a partnership forged between the town’s Paul Revere Heritage Commission and Revere Copper […]

True Tales from Canton’s Past: Spur Line

Canton Center rail crossing with Canton Station (left), now the MBTA parking lot in Canton Center (Courtesy of the Canton Historical Society)

Perhaps the greatest joy of living in Canton is that it still sits with one foot in the past and one foot firmly in the now. There are anachronistic reminders of yesteryear if you know where to look. As you pass over the railroad tracks at Canton Center, heading north towards Memorial Hall, take a […]

True Tales from Canton’s Past: Coasting Back in Time

Mildred Morse Allen’s sled, which was purchased from Jordan Marsh Co. circa 1910 (In the collection of the Canton Historical Society)

The boys had done this exercise countless times. The weather was perfect and the early December freeze made for excellent conditions. Two old sleds were taken from the Aldrich barn in Ponkapoag. The metal skids had been repaired by the blacksmith and he didn’t charge a penny for work that cost him $4. The boys […]

True Tales: Lost Cursive

Forty-five years ago I boarded a bus on Walpole Street and was dropped off at the Revere School on Chapman Street. The memory of that day burns vividly. I can recall the smell of crayons and paste, floor wax and ammonia, fresh air and sunlight flooding the room. We were a large class, by today’s […]

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